C3-PO Mandella Effect.

Does C3-PO have a silver leg?

Due in part to the relatively tight budget George Lucas had for the first Star Wars movie, ‘A New Hope,’ the C-3PO outfit worn by Anthony Daniels was far from perfect. On the very first day of filming the costume kept falling apart every few minutes, a situation that made working in the deserts of Tunisia an especially grueling task.

This situation was made worse when a section of the left leg shattered and forced itself straight through the plastic covering and into Daniels’ foot. Fortunately the injury was minor, but the problems with the costume were never really fixed for the duration of the shoot. Consequently there are numerous sequences where only the top half of C-3PO is in view because Anthony Daniels is not wearing the bottom section of the costume.

C3P0 FACT
The Chive

Many people have queried if, perhaps, the silver leg was one of Lucas’ digital alterations. After all, Lucas made the ‘special edition’ original trilogy as the ‘definitive versions’ and, until recently as a bonus disc with Blue Ray, the unaltered original copies have not been available. The following images are from publications before the digital alterations.

Images like this may have helped to cement an “all gold” image in people’s minds.

In the following image he looks gold, until you look closely at his leg and realize that it is, indeed, a different shade. In this picture, Lucas’ is correct in saying the sand reflected off his silver, making it appear golden in most scenes.

Look closely. These legs are different.

But then there are images of merchandise, such as the following model claiming: “designed from the actual android,” in which we see, clearly, two golden legs. So the silver-leg was overlooked by merchandisers, and the lack of continuity has raised many questions and much incredulity among the Mandela Effect community.

Authentic model kit sold in 1977.

This article here discusses the Kenner line of toys, specifically the droids. In the pictures it’s hard to tell if he’s golden or silver – the colours reflect themselves and each other – the sheen on the gold looks silvery, just as the sheen on the silver movie C3PO looks gold, reflecting the rest of the droids body. The article discusses how the toy was painted with a full gold finish. It’s simply easier and cheaper to mass manufacture a toy and paint it entirely one colour, then manufacture a different coloured piece.

At Wookieepedia, the entry on C3PO says this: “C-3PO was built from spare parts by Anakin Skywalker, a human slave who lived in Mos Espa, a city on the Outer Rim world of Tatooine. C-3PO’s memory was erased, though R2-D2’s memory was not. C-3PO and R2-D2 were assigned to the Alderaan cruiser Tantive IV, where they served senator Bail Organa for nineteen years. At some point during this time, 3PO’s right leg was fitted with a mismatched droid plating.” This corroborates George Lucas’ story about the reason why they didn’t paint the new leg plating (mentioned earlier in this article.)

It also goes on to mention that C3PO’s components were originally manufactured off world on Affa, about a century before the Naboo invasion. “At some point, however, C-3PO fell into disrepair, and his vital components ended up in a junk pile on Tatooine. Anakin Skywalker, a slave boy from the Tatooinian city of Mos Espa, collected scrap parts and started rebuilding C-3PO so the droid would help his mother.[19] Although protocol droids were normally designed for light duty in luxurious environments, Skywalker specially modified C-3PO so he could withstand Tatooine’s sand and heat.[20] C-3PO served Anakin and his mother Shmi by performing household chores. During his time with Skywalker and Shmi, C-3PO’s wiring was left exposed since Skywalker was unable to outfit him with an outer covering.” Later, in Attack of The Clones, when C3PO goes with Anakin’s mother to live with the Lars family on the moisture farm, C-3PO is given silver plating to shield him from Tatooine’s sandy environment.

In the animated series, The Clone Wars, C3PO’s legs get blown off on Cymoon 1, and in Attack of The Clones his head is easily detached and reattached onto a battle droid (and vice versa), and in The Empire Strikes Back, he is completely disassembled by imperial troopers on Cloud City. In The Force Awakens we see he has a new arm for some reason. There is ample evidence to show us how poorly designed Threepio is, that he breaks so easily (perhaps this backstory and later inclusions were inspired by the issues they had with the first costume while filming A New Hope.) It would make sense that the shin plating on his leg would need to be replaced at some point before Episode IV takes place in Lucas’ “used universe.”

On the website Starwarshelmets.com, there is technical details about the manufacture of the costume and numerous numerous photos. It is surprising how often the gold looks silver, even in Episode 3 which is the only film C3PO is actually all gold.

The main problem, I believe, with the whole C-3PO Mandela Effect theory is illustrated by the following image:

Once you see it – you can’t unsee it, as the saying goes. The leg is the same – it was always there, an unimportant and small detail we weren’t aware of, and then it was one day brought to our attention and the whole thing has been blown out of proportion.

Interview with Anthony Daniels http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/entertainthis/2015/12/15/anthony-daniels-c3po-star-wars/77341766/

http://www.blastr.com/2014-9-17/anthony-daniels-talks-refusing-cg-episode-vii-and-why-c-3po-will-never-die

The Berenstein/Berenstain Bears

I’m not going to go into the Mandela Effect. If you are unfamiliar with it, then you won’t understand what this article is about. If you are familiar with it, then hopefully this article can raise or answer questions for you, depending on what your beliefs and experiences are. I will try to look at this subject from both sides of the argument and will try to keep my bias out of it. Personally, I find this whole thing fascinating – whether it is proof of Quantum Pollution or simply mass delusion or cognitive dissonance.

ck57251ce2

Section One: Typo’s or Remnants?

  1. Norwell Public Library. On the Norwell Public Library site is a listing of education children’s books. On this list is the following: The Berenstein Bears and the Drug Free Zone” by Stan Berenstain. Brother and Sister Bear try to solve the mystery of how illegal drugs are getting into their school. J BERENSTEIN. 

Opinion: Mistakes and printing errors can occur, but I do find it odd that a Librarian would spell the Author and the book title wrong on the library website.

See for yourself on the Norwell Public Library website.

2) http://www.80scartoons.net In the archives of the internet is a website that collated information on 80’s cartoons. The Berenstein Bears was one such cartoon. On the 5th of February and the 5th of April in 2001, the entries on this site are Berenstein. On the first two entries, all links and references to books and films are also spelled Berenstein. However, from 5th August 2001 the show becomes Berenstain, as do all links, references and facts. Credit goes to Ya OughtaLearn  who posted a video posted on Daikhlo.com where I learned about this.

Opinion: It seems strange that, even if typos were made and then discovered, that the web author didn’t correct the first two entries and the relevant links and facts. The web author may not have even noticed their mistake, or perhaps was simply too lazy to correct their previous work.

Checkout 80’s Cartoons for yourself or view the original video on Daikhlo.

3) The Berenstein Bears Camping Adventure video game. On the Bears’ Wikipedia article it lists all the video game and software titles, and is accordingly spelled with an A. However, on YouTube there is game play footage where the opening title clearly spells Berenstein. There is also another video of game play spelled BerenSTAIN. On website Sega Retro, there is archived information about both the Genesis and the Game Gear versions – the scanned packaging and cartridges both clearly with an A.

Opinion: Perhaps, riding on the popularity of ME somebody has edited this footage to fake proof of ME. These old games are hard to come by, so it would be tough to prove or disprove the argument. According to the Retro Sega website there were never alternative spellings for the games, they were always published as Berenstain Bears.

View the Retro Sega archive here, or you can watch game play footage from BerenSTEIN Bears on youtube is here, and game play footage of the BerenSTAIN Bears on youtube here.

4) Practitioner Teacher Inquiry and ResearchPractitioner Teacher Inquiry and Research explores the concept and importance of the teacher practitioner, and prepares students in teacher education courses and programs to conduct research in the classroom. Author Carolyn Babione has extensive experience in undergraduate- and graduate-level teacher training and teacher inquiry coursework. In the book, Babione guides students through the background, theory, and strategy required to successfully conduct classroom research. The first part of the book tackles the “how-to” and “why” of teacher inquiry, while the second part provides students with real-life practitioner inquiry research projects across a range of school settings, content areas, and teaching strategies.

CAROLYN BABIONE, PHD, a former classroom teacher, is professor emerita of education at Indiana University Southeast, a regional campus of Indiana University. PTIR was published December 2014 by Josse-Bass. ISBN 978-1-118-58873-4.

While searching on Google Books I found that the index of this book lists references to BerenSTEIN (both the books and authors are spelled this way), but when you click on the page links everything actually written in the book is BerenSTAIN. How did this kind of error get to print?

Here is a listing for Practitioner Teacher Inquiry and Research on Wiley.com. And here is a link to the scanned index, found on Google Books (page 301.)

5) YouTube links.

Robby Santiago was sent a photo of a VHS from a friend, titled: Berenstein Bears and the Disappearing Honey Pot. Unfortunately this could also have been photo shopped or edited some other way. It would be interesting to find other copies of this title for comparison.

berenstein-e1473816384737-475x166

6) The following is a list of books and magazines, with links, found on google books that aren’t able to be read online. I am supplying these as I would love proof from scanned hardcopies. If you search google books you will, literally, find thousands of entries for Berenstein Bears – so I have just provided a selection to show that it is more than a typo in low-budget publications.

Language, Literacy and the Child. In the Second Edition of this popular textbook, Galda, Cullinan, and Strickland continue to show new teachers how to use children’s literature to support English language arts teaching and learning in kindergarten through eighth-grade classrooms. LANGUAGE, LITERACY, AND THE CHILD presents current theories and research alongside practical classroom applications. With this organization, the authors provide theoretically sound, literature-based practices and teaching ideas to help students as they begin to teach. As with the previous book, the index lists STEIN but a further search of the text shows that in the book itself it is only spelled STAIN.

Drum: A Magazine of Africa for Africa. This magazine shows in their TV listings a slotted episode of Berenstein Bears. Unfortunately, I can not find an archived copy of this to further investigate.

Media Information Australia, Issues 75-76Published by Australian Film and TV School, North Ryde, 1995. This is another example of a publication that you would expect to be able to spell the name of the media it discusses correctly. And again, it is one that cannot be read on google books.

Companies And Their Brands, issue 9, volume 2. Surely this publication would get the name of the brand spelled correctly? But you guessed it. Berenstein again.

Billboard magazine, in a full title search on google books, spells it STEIN from 1996 to 2001.

New York Magazine has, on two occasions in 1984, spelled it Berenstein Bears for their tv/movie listings.

In conclusion, it is clear that assumptions and errors have been made. We have to be ready to admit that mistakes happen. Encyclopedias and dictionaries have had errors in them, but this does not make them definitive or true. And it’s when these alternative sources of information are referenced that these contradictory ideas can arise.

Please feel free to comment if you liked this article or have any information/experiences you would like to share on this topic.